April 2019 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Boost Your Immunity with ACUPUNCTURE and CHINESE MEDICINE
» Live in a High-Income Country? Don’t Expect the Highest Life Expectancy
» Young and Overweight? Your Heart May Suffer
» ADHD May Be on the Rise in U.S. Children

Boost Your Immunity with ACUPUNCTURE and CHINESE MEDICINE

The cold season can prove to be a difficult time for many of us to keep healthy and fight off the seasonal colds and flu. Chinese Medicine, by the use of acupuncture, dietary therapy and Chinese herbs, offers a natural alternative to help your body stay balanced and function at its best. The stimulation of certain acupuncture points has been proven to increase the number of white blood cells which fight off infections, boost your lungs function and lower the levels of stress-induced hormones, such as cortisol, which suppress your immune system. Given the preventative power of this medicine, regular acupuncture treatments in conjunction with herbs (when needed) are recommended during this time of the year.
Here’s a few additional tips that will improve your chances at staying healthy:

• eat foods that are warm, cooked and nourishing as this helps your body have more energy for fighting off the bugs that you come in contact with; this is the perfect time for making teas, soups, stews and steaming foods
• make sure you are eating enough vegetables and fruits daily; cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, swiss chard, bok choy, and daikon radish increase immune cells and reduce your chances of developing certain types of cancer; carrots, goji berries, sweet potato, spinach, butternut squash are rich in beta-carotene and promote new skin cells as well as protect the mucosal lining of the lungs and digestive system; increase intake of vitamin C rich foods such as watermelon and cantaloupe, kiwis, strawberries, blackberries, grapefruits, red and yellow peppers
• avoid eating lots of dairy, salads, or other cold, raw foods; avoid eating large portions, rather eat frequent small meals
• keep energy up and avoid exhausting yourself
• be sure to get enough sleep and rest
• avoid stress and emotional issues
• when you go out into a windy and cold environment, keep warm and protect yourself with clothing such as a scarf
• after washing your hair, make sure it is dry before going outside or before going to bed
• a cool shower once a day boosts immunity
• exercise outside, whatever the weather, is beneficial
• take probiotics- beneficial bacteria when properly maintained in your gut are one of the body’s strongest lines of defense.

Author: Dr. Ramona Goldman
Source: 2014 Newsletter
Copyright: Family Life Chiropractic Center 2014


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Live in a High-Income Country? Don’t Expect the Highest Life Expectancy

Two new studies are revealing some startling facts about recent life expectancies in high-income countries like the U.S.: They're declining, but for surprising reasons. The first of the studies examined life expectancy trends among 18 countries with high income. Overwhelmingly, most of them experienced simultaneous declines in 2015 for the first time in decades. In the U.S., drug overdoses due to the opioid epidemic are to blame for a large number of young adult deaths. In other high-income countries, a harsh flu was mostly behind declining life expectancies during the 2014-2015 season. Most were able to rebound their rates during 2015-2016, but the U.K. and the U.S. were not among them. Meanwhile, a second study adds that the opioid epidemic is just the beginning – deaths from alcohol abuse and suicide are also on the rise in the U.S., not to mention death during middle age due to diseases of the organs, including the heart, digestive system, and lungs. The second study also suggests that lower life expectancies may have psychological and socioeconomic origins. In short, what causes people in low socioeconomic groups to make bad health choices like smoking, abusing alcohol, and eating unhealthy foods?  The German researchers behind the study, from the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, suggest that stress from income inequality, social exclusion, and more can be the starting point.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The BMJ, online August 22, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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Young and Overweight? Your Heart May Suffer

Young adults who are overweight are at high risk for high blood pressure and damage to the heart, just like older adults. According to a study from the U.K.'s University of Bristol, the correlation between a high BMI (body mass index) and cardiovascular issues applies to young people, too. To come to their conclusions, researchers studied data collected from over 3,000 young people born during the '90s, who were 17 years old when the study took place. Researchers also looked at the cardiovascular scans of 400 high-risk, 21-year-old adults. The 17-year-olds' average BMI was in the so-called "healthy" range. The average blood pressure of the group was also in the range considered "healthy" (under 130 mmHg for a systolic reading and under 80 mmHg for a diastolic reading).  In general, young adults who had higher BMIs in the study also had a better chance of developing high blood pressure. They additionally found that having a high BMI correlates to a higher left ventricular mass index (meaning the left ventricle of the heart is enlarged). This means that the young adults who weighed more correspondingly had more blood pumping through their bodies every minute. Over time, this may lead to a variety of heart issues, including a thickened heart muscle and high blood pressure. According to a Harvard Medical School researcher, this may be because those at a higher weight have bodies with higher metabolic demands. They may also have more inflammation due to their increased amount of fat cells.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Circulation, online July 30, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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ADHD May Be on the Rise in U.S. Children

According to a new study published in JAMA Network Open, diagnoses of children with ADHD (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) have increased significantly since 1997. Researchers found that the diagnosis rate for children with ADHD increased from 6.1% in 1997 to 10.2% in 2016. However, according to Dr. Wei Bao, there could be lots of reasons for this dramatic rise. For example, doctors are much better at diagnosing ADHD than they were 20 years ago. Dr. Bao also said that more people today are aware of the condition and its symptoms, which can lead to more kids getting screened and subsequently diagnosed. Bao and his fellows are researchers at the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa. They came to their conclusions by reviewing the National Health Interview Survey over 20 years. In particular, they honed in on answers to one question: Whether survey-takers' children had ever been diagnosed with ADHD or ADD (attention-deficit disorder). For scope, the most recent iteration of the survey from 2015-2016 collected data on over 18,000 children from age 4-17. Of that number, nearly 2,000 received an ADHD diagnosis. Though the research results are startling, experts advise parents and doctors to take the increase in children with ADHD with a grain of salt. This is because ADHD is commonly misdiagnosed.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Network Open, online August 31, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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